Shakespeare-DroeshoutOne of the more ill-informed little posts on the Shakespeare authorship that you are likely to see anytime soon popped up on a Washington Post blog yesterday. That it comes from an assistant editor might have been surprising once, but not in 2014 when anyone who knows anything certainly knows that the Washington Post of yesterday is long gone. The post (Why Shakespeare WAS Shakespeare) directs readers to the latest book (with the same title) from Stanley Wells, a $1.99 kindle e-book on amazon.com that lets us know (again) that “Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare,” so please ignore 150 years of controversy, and also please ignore the 2,500 individuals (many prominent actors, authors, jurists and scholars) who continue to disagree (e.g., see The Declaration of Reasonable Doubt). The Declaration site’s founder and chairperson John Shahan is engaged in an interesting set of exchanges in the reviews/comments section under the book listing at amazon.com. Check it out.

From the blog:

Pity the Shakespeare scholars. For more than a century now, they’ve been distracted from actual scholarship by zany arguments that the man from Stratford-upon-Avon did not write the plays we attribute to him.

All of this flared up (again) a few years ago when Roland Emmerich released a silly costume drama called “Anonymous,” which posited that Edward de Vere was the true (secret) author of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” et al.

Pity the Shakespeare scholars. For more than a century now, they’ve been distracted from actual scholarship by zany arguments that the man from Stratford-upon-Avon did not write the plays we attribute to him.

Readers interested in a brief summary of the claims and a strong defense of the Bard might consider Stanley Wells’s new Kindle single, “Why Shakespeare WAS Shakespeare” ($1.99). In about 60 pages, the esteemed scholar and editor considers the various anti-Shakespeare arguments (and some of their loonier proponents) and provides a quick, well-grounded rebuttal. Along the way, he also gives an overview of what is known about Shakespeare’s life.

Online, Wells’s essay has already attracted the opprobrium of skeptics. “It appears that Mr. Wells has simply copied old arguments from previous books on the subject,” writes a customer named Mark Twain. (Rumors of his death are, apparently, greatly exaggerated, but that’s a whole nuther conspiracy). “Worst, he keeps repeating various ‘facts’ that are simply long-held assumptions. When will modern scholars start thinking for themselves, or doing their own research?” Sigh.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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